Friday, April 13, 2012

James Wall, Richard Curtis on TJ Radio today

Truth Jihad Radio Fri. 4/13/12, 3-5 pm Central, American Freedom Radio (archived here.) Call-in: (402) 237-2525 or post your questions to my Facebook page.

Interfaith dialogue Friday! After praying jumuah, I'll be interviewing two religious studies experts - leading liberal Christian journalist James Wall, and non-theist ethnic-Jewish post-Marxist (I'm sure I got some of that wrong) Richard Curtis.

First hour: James Wall, author of the new article Gunter Grass Exposes Israel As a Nuclear Power that "Endangers" a Fragile World Peace.

James Wall is a Methodist minister and the former editor and current contributing editor of Christian Century magazine, "considered the flagship magazine of U.S. mainline Protestantism." He is the author of the book Hidden Treasures: Searching for God in Modern Culture (Christian Century Press) and has had essays published in many other books.

A former Air Force lieutenant, James Wall has traveled on assignment for his magazines to the Middle East, (Palestine, Israel, and Jordan, a total of 21 Middle East trips since 1973); Germany, Poland, Spain, Italy, Nicaragua Guatemala, Bolivia, England, Angola, Kenya, and Uganda.

He describes how he became involved in the Palestinian-Israeli issue here.

Second hour: Philosophy and Religious Studies professor Dr. Richard Curtis, 9/11 truth supporter and former Senate candidate (i-WA); editor, Reasonable Perspectives on Religion (which includes my essay "Is Islam Reasonable?")

Richard writes: "Of late I have been working on three projects and each might be interesting to you.

"1. Rocky Anderson's presidential campaign, and building an alternative party to the left of the Democrats.
2. Something I am calling Hospice for Humanity -- a push to recognize the need to prepare for humanity as we know it to end. I have attached a paper I am working on about this.
3. A generic definition of "spirituality." Turns out this is a topic that religion scholars generally avoid, and in doing so give preference to particular forms of spirituality. But it seems to me that for any of that to be really meaningful we need a real generic. Curiously there really is no existing scholarly definition to appeal to, so I am trying to define that."

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