Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Islam expert Prof. Khaled Abou El Fadl on shariah, 9/11 truth, and much more

Broadcast here April 17th, 11 to noon Eastern then archived. For less than a dollar a week you can subscribe...and listen to this show RIGHT NOW!  Click HERE.

Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl is one of the world’s leading authorities on Islamic law and Islam, and a prominent scholar in the field of human rights. He is author of 14 books (five forthcoming) and over 50 articles on various topics in Islam and Islamic law.  The Omar and Azmeralda Alfi Distinguished Professor in Islamic Law at the UCLA School of Law, he teaches International Human Rights, Islamic Jurisprudence, National Security Law, Law and Terrorism, Islam and Human Rights, Political Asylum and Political Crimes and Legal Systems.

In this interview, Dr. Abou El Fadl begins with a concise and eloquent introduction to what Shariah law really means. (You may be surprised.) We briefly discuss the Sunni/Shia issues that came up in my recent interview with Ibrahim Soudy. Then Dr. Abou El Fadl movingly apologize for his years of acceptance of the official story of 9/11, which, after further study of the issue, he now rejects as an obvious impossibility. Going even further, he states that, as a member of the legal team for defendants in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, he has long recognized that there are extremely serious questions about likely US government or insider involvement in that atrocity as well. On the basis of those two problematic events, Dr. Abou El Fadl suggests that we need to question the official history of the so-called "war on terror" and take a skeptical attitude toward the series of spectacular post-9/11 terror events blamed on "radical Muslims." But historical truth, he asserts, often takes many decades to emerge.

Other topics in this special 90-minute show include Islamophobia, Wahhabism, spirituality, the intersection of religion and politics, the rise of psychopathic philosophies of selfishness (neoconservatism, Ayn Rand) and the roles of truth, beauty, critiques of power, and opposition to injustice and oppression in the religion of Islam.



1 comment:

  1. That reminds me of the old French whore asking the young American Dough-boy: "And where are you from son?" "Kansas ma'am. Isn't everybody?"

    How can people be so "Good" and "Innocent" as to not know what this country is?

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